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Spyro Orange: The Cortex Conspiracy, known as Spyro Fusion in Europe and Spyro Advance: Waku Waku Tomodachi Daisakusen! in Japan, is the fourth Spyro game for the Game Boy Advance. It is one part in a crossover pair between the Crash Bandicoot and Spyro game universes, the second game being Crash Bandicoot Purple: Ripto's Rampage.

Plot

The story begins with Doctor Neo Cortex and Ripto joining forces to rid themselves of their respective nemeses Crash Bandicoot and Spyro the Dragon by genetically modifying Ripto's "Riptoc" minions and disguising them as Crash and Spyro, leading the two protagonists to believe they are against each other. Crash and Spyro are alerted of their respective worlds' predicament and are sent to get rid of the disguised Riptocs. Crash and Spyro eventually encounter each other at Dragon Castles and Wumpa Jungle, believing each other to be a disguised Riptoc. However, they soon discover that they have been tricked into fighting each other by Cortex and Ripto and decide to team up against them.

Cover jp

The Japanese cover for the game.

Not even Tiny Tiger, Crush or Gulp can stop them, but Cortex uses his niece, Nina Cortex, to kidnap Coco and the Professor. Blink the Mole informs Crash and Spyro what happened to Coco and the Professor. Spyro rescues Coco and the Professor while Crash distracts Nina. Finally, Crash and Spyro defeat Nina at her own game. Coco has an idea: If they put a tracer on Cortex and Ripto, they would track them to their headquarters. Crash defeats Ripto, but he forgot to insert the tracer. Spyro defeats Cortex and he puts the tracer on him. Crash and Spyro reach their headquarters in outer space. As a team, Crash and Spyro defeat Cortex and Ripto. They thank each other as the games ends with a photo of Crash having Spyro in a friendly headlock, and the credits roll.

Gameplay

Crash and Spyro have to travel in five different worlds, collecting crystals and gems (in Crash's case), defeating the monsters (Spyro's case), and fighting the bosses. There are many mini-games and the opportunity to trade trading cards.

Bosses

Reception

Spyro Orange was not as popular as other Spyro games, as it is a side-scrolling platformer, in contrast to previous Game Boy Advance titles which used a free-roaming, isometric field, more comparable to Spyro's 3D origins.

Spyro Orange's sales were, however, rather positive, likely due to being a crossover game.

Gallery

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